Category Medicinal plants

Horse chestnut - Aesculus hippocastanum
Medicinal plants

Horse chestnut - Aesculus hippocastanum

We simply refer to the seeds of the wild chestnut as chestnuts. Children make toys out of it, and the trees provide shade in summer. It is hardly known, meanwhile, that this character tree of our cities contains active ingredients that inhibit blood clotting and help against chronic venous insufficiency.

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Medicinal plants

Fern as a medicinal plant - effect and application

Ferns are among the oldest plants and originated in ancient times, almost 200 million years before flowering plants developed. They have various active ingredients, some of which are not found in any other plant.In Germany, in addition to the stag tongue and spotted fern, the worm fern (fern) was popular as a medicinal plant in folk medicine - as the name suggests, this served as a highly effective one Anti-parasite agents in the gastrointestinal tract.
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Medicinal plants

Ginger - effect, recipes and plant yourself

Ginger is a versatile medicinal plant that is known to help against colds and nausea and to increase vitality. When taken daily, the unique power of ginger to fight and prevent serious illnesses and inflammation comes to its fullest potential. Whether taken as ginger tea, ginger water with turmeric or lemon, as a ginger capsule or as a ginger shot, the possibilities for use are as diverse as the range of effects of the ginger plant, and you can even plant it at home.
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Medicinal plants

Buttercup - Sharp buttercups

Buttercup is a popular expression for various meadow flowers, especially buttercups - the Ranunculus genus comprises around 400 species. The perennial sharp buttercup (Ranunculus acris) is the most common in Germany. Dandelions are also known as buttercups.
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Medicinal plants

Rowan - Rowanberry as a medicinal plant

The mountain ash, with names such as “rowan berries” or “thrush berries”, indicates that birds love their fruits. In contrast, the berries are popularly known to be toxic to humans. Wrongly: The rowanberries taste really good only when cooked, but they are not toxic, on the contrary they are very healthy.
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Medicinal plants

Hibiscus - ingredients, effects and application

Hibiscus belongs to the mallow family and is known for its magnificent, expansive hibiscus flowers. This flower from the tropical and subtropical plant is a typical symbol on Hawaiian shirts and a symbol of the exotic. Hibiscus is popular as a houseplant, and the colorful wonder decorates many gardens.
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Medicinal plants

Cyclamen - effects, uses and dangers

The name "Cyclamen" suggests that this plant grows in the Alps. However, this is only the case for the European cyclamen. All other species are native to the Mediterranean and Asia Minor. The scientific name for the European cyclamen (also called "wild cyclamen") is Cyclamen europaeum or Cyclamen purpurascens.
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Medicinal plants

Oak as a medicinal plant - effect and application

In this country we call oak, the long or summer oak, one of around 400 Quercus species from the Fagaceae family, the beech family. It was the sacred tree of Thor, the god of thunder, and the symbol of the German forest, a symbol of steadfastness and eternal life. The fantasies surrounding the “German oak” hide that the real tannins in the tree are ideal for stopping bleeding and preventing inflammation.
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Medicinal plants

Dandelion Root - Dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis)

It is one of the most popular wildflowers and is an integral part of both wild flower meadows and domestic gardens. We are talking about the real dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis), whose bright yellow flowers can be identified by every child. Like the dandelion leaves, they are often used in the wild herb kitchen.
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Medicinal plants

European beech - Fagus silvatica

European beech, mostly called beech, is a character tree in Germany. Under natural conditions, much of the country would consist of mixed beech and oak forests. Since almost all parts of the tree have medicinal effects, medicines from the leaves, bark, seeds and wood of the plant were widely used in folk medicine and are still important for phytotherapy today.
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Medicinal plants

Horse chestnut - Aesculus hippocastanum

We simply refer to the seeds of the wild chestnut as chestnuts. Children make toys out of it, and the trees provide shade in summer. It is hardly known, meanwhile, that this character tree of our cities contains active ingredients that inhibit blood clotting and help against chronic venous insufficiency.
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Medicinal plants

Fir as a medicinal plant - effect and application

We know the Christmas tree illuminated at Christmas time. The silver fir (Abies alba), however, provides a lot of healing substances in its branch tips and cones. We use them as bath oil, in cosmetics, in soaps and as a cold balm. New studies show great potential against inflammatory diseases.
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Medicinal plants

Adonis floret - Adonis vernalis

Such a small, pretty, yellow flower with such a great effect and then poisonous too - there is talk of the Adonis floret. Although the name is reminiscent of a rose, this plant does not belong to the rose family. Even the sight of the Adonis beauty enchants the viewer and brightens the mood.
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Medicinal plants

Fig - Ficus carica

The fig leaf with which Adam and Eve cover their pubes is one of the oldest records of a cultivated plant. Even today, the real fig is particularly common in the Middle East. It is full of vitamins and minerals, is an ideal energy kick for long hikes and new studies show enormous potential for therapies against worms, bacterial infections, cramps and blood clots - even against cancer.
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Medicinal plants

Wundklee - Bärenklee (Anthyllis vulneraria)

The German name Wundklee already shows that this plant was used in medical history to treat wounds - the Latin name Anthyllis vulneraria also refers to this. In addition, he served as Hustenmittel.Steckbrief to Wundklee Name: Wundklee Scientific name: / SchmetterlingsblütlerVolksnamen Fabaceae: Anthyllis vulnerariaFamilie fir Klee, Bärenpratzen, Frauenkäppli, Muttergottesschühlein, bear clover, Bergkraut, gold button, Hasenklee, cotton flower, wool Klee, Russian clover, sheep tooth, beard clover, pharmacists clover, summer clover , Kretzenkraut, Katzenklee, Katzentapen, Katzenbratzerl, SchöpfliApplications: External wounds such as abrasions and reddeningBruises and sprainsCough remediesUsed plant parts: flowers and leavesIngredientsWound clover contains tannins (0.6 percent tannins, presumably of the catechin and isofonoide, plant flavonone, flavonone, flavonone, flavonone, sapononone, flavonone, saponone and flavonone), sap
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Medicinal plants

Rhombus - Rhombus (Ruta graveolens)

We know the taste of the rhombus or garden rhombus from aperitifs and liqueurs. In ancient times it was considered a powerful protection against various poisons, in the Middle Ages the "dead herb" was even supposed to cure the plague. Today we know: Rhombus contains medically effective substances, but also has strong side effects, including poisoning and death.
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Medicinal plants

Coltsfoot - application, effects and risks

Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara), a meadow plant from the daisy family, bears its name as a medicinal plant. The Latin "tussis" means cough and "ago" means "I drive out". The messenger of spring with the golden yellow tongue flowers was widely used in folk medicine as an expectorant for stucking coughs and as a remedy for respiratory diseases.
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Medicinal plants

Dewberry - Ackerberry (Rubus caesius)

The field berry, more commonly known as the dewberry, is related to the blackberry native to us. It is slightly smaller than the blackberry and also has thorns. However, these are much smaller and softer, do not sting, but only scratch. Perhaps it is therefore dewberry genannt.Steckbrief KratzbeereWissenschaftlicher Name: Rubus caesiusPflanzenfamilie: rose family (Rosaceae) Folk names: dewberry, Frosted blackberry, Bock Berry, KroatzbeereVorkommen: Europe and North Asia Applications: inflammation of MundschleimhautZahnfleischentzündungenVerdauungsstörungenAtembeschwerdenAusflussHautekzemeAkneWundheilungVerwendete plant parts: leaves, berry ingredients: tannins, flavonoids, fruit acids, abundant The ingredients of the dewberry are responsible for their effectiveness.
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Medicinal plants

Field Mint - Mentha arvensis

The field mint belongs to the mint species. Her healing powers are really worth mentioning, even if she is not as well known as peppermint.Staff Scientific name: Mentha arvensisPlant family: labiate flowers (Lamiaceae) Popular names: cornmint, field mint, garden mint Occurrence: almost worldwideApplications: digestive disorders: essential oil (menthol), tanning agents, flavonoids
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Medicinal plants

Centaurium - Centaurium erythraea

The centaury has been very popular as a medicinal plant since ancient times - especially against stomach problems and skin inflammation. Our grandparents knew it as a medicine to get rid of the annoying roundworms. Studies show a strong effect against pathogenic fungi. Fact sheet for the centaury Scientific name: Centaurium centaurium, Centaurium erythraea Common names: Bitter herb, Erdgallenkraut, Fieberkraut, Roter Aurin, Centaur herb, Gottesadaderkraut, Arder tea, all-round medication, herbal medicine Mother of God herb, Apothermic flower, Thousand Power, Waxweed, Eyebrow, Aurine herb, Hundred floret herb, Stomach herb Fields of application: stomach complaints, fever, loss of appetite, dyspeptic ailments, liver and bile problems Used parts of plants: Upper, dried parts of flowering plants Ingredients contain biologically active components, including herbicidal ingredients Gentiopikrin and sweroside.
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