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Diet: Low-fat milk is more likely to promote obesity than whole milk

Diet: Low-fat milk is more likely to promote obesity than whole milk



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Lower risk of being overweight: whole milk for children is better than low-fat milk

A scientific study by researchers from Canada has shown that children who drank low-fat milk are significantly more likely to be overweight or obese than children who consumed whole milk.

Many people prefer low-fat milk because they think it can keep them lean. Scientists from Canada, however, are now reporting that skimmed milk does not appear to reduce weight.

Numerous studies from different countries analyzed

A systematic review and meta-analysis conducted by St. Michael's Hospital of Unity Health in Toronto, Canada showed that children who drank whole milk were 40 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than children who were low-fat consumed.

According to a statement, the scientific paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition analyzed 28 studies from seven countries that looked at the relationship between children who drink cow's milk and the risk of being overweight or obese.

None of the studies, involving a total of nearly 21,000 children and adolescents aged one to 18 years, showed that children who drank low-fat milk were less at risk of becoming overweight or obese.

18 of the 28 studies showed that children who drank whole milk were less likely to be overweight or obese.

Current guidelines are being challenged

The results said the results question Canadian and international guidelines that require children from the age of two to consume low-fat cow's milk instead of whole milk to reduce the risk of obesity.

"The majority of children in Canada and the United States consume cow's milk every day, and for many children this is an important contribution to fat consumption," said Dr. Jonathon Maguire, lead author of the study and pediatrician at St. Michaels Hospital.

"In our review, children who followed the current recommendation to switch to low-fat milk at the age of two were no slimmer than those who consumed whole milk."

Cause and effect study would be necessary

Dr. Maguire hopes to find the cause and effect of whole milk and a lower risk of obesity in a randomized, controlled trial.

“All of the studies we examined were observational, which means that we cannot be sure whether whole milk leads to the lower risk of being overweight or obese. Whole milk may have been linked to other factors that have reduced the risk of being overweight or obese, ”said the study author.

"A randomized controlled trial would help determine cause and effect, but none was found in the literature." (Ad)

Author and source information

This text corresponds to the specifications of the medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical doctors.

Swell:

  • St. Michael's Hospital Toronto: Study: Children who drank whole milk had lower risk of being overweight or obese compared to kids who drank reduced-fat milk, (accessed: January 5, 2020), St. Michael's Hospital Toronto
  • American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: Whole milk compared with reduced-fat milk and childhood overweight: a systematic review and meta-analysis, (access: 05.01.2020), American Journal of Clinical Nutrition


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